Featured Stories

On October 18, 2013, after four years of negotiations, Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper and José Manuel Barroso, President of the European Commission, signed a “tentative” CETA agreement in Brussels. CETA stands for Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement, and is said by Harper to be the biggest trade deal Canada has ever made, even bigger than North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA).

by Elizabeth May

When I practiced environmental law, I used to joke that the challenge in Canada was that we didn’t have environmental laws to enforce. When Richard Nixon was US President, he brought in a slew of strong laws, with scope for enforcement by the courts.  The National Environmental Protection Act (which mandated advance environmental reviews), the Clean Air Act, Clean Water Act and Endangered Species Act were all brought in under Nixon. The US Endangered Species Act allowed a judge to review the habitat requirements for the

by Susan MacVittie

Many of us are familiar with the endless amount of emails stuffed into our Inbox asking us to sign an online petition. Petition sites such as Avaaz, Change.org, SumofUs, and LeadNow have given a digital voice to millions of people and organizations. They  use online petitions to work towards changing laws, influencing corporate behaviour, and making communities healthier and more equitable.

On December 22 the National Energy Board recommended approval of the Northern Gateway pipeline, and some of the people who otherwise distrust government, want it out of the economy, and hate quasi-judicial independent appointed bla bla bla – are lining up to praise the probity and wisdom of the Joint Review Panel. Some of these folks are your friends and relatives. Some have a wider audience.


I’m a 26-year-old musician and I’m part of a generation that has inherited a profoundly serious problem – the global environment is tapped out and on the verge of collapse. Our oceans are heavily polluted and overfished, climate change is happening faster and more aggressively than most scientists anticipated,

(via Reviving Gaia)

I recently took part in a “Village Workshop” at the Klahoose New Relationship Building on Cortes Island, in Western Canada. This is a novel introduction to the Native American perception of their history in that it involves role playing. There were…

December 19, 2013

by Susan MacVittie

The Enbridge Pipeline project has been given the green light.

Today the Joint Review Panel for the proposed Enbridge Northern Gateway Project today recommended that the federal government approve the project, subject to 209 required conditions.

by Lucy Sharratt

Biotechnology corporations would like us to believe that their technology can remake industrial agriculture and usher in a second “Green Revolution” that will feed the entire world. Now that genetically modified organisms (GMOs) have been in the ground for almost 20 years, we can evaluate the reality of GMOs, and their future “green” potential. We can also look at our options for making green food choices.

A fundamental problem, that’s never been dealt with, is that

by Dawn Paley

In rural towns throughout Mexico, life carries on as it has for generations. Sons help their fathers haul wood, women tend to the fire and select seeds, and whole families take part in sowing, caring for and harvesting crops.

by Joyce Nelson

In early September, Rainforest Action Network (RAN) launched a major campaign targeting 20 of the largest snack food companies that use palm oil in their candy bars and potato chips. “Cut Conflict Palm Oil, Not Rainforests” says RAN, citing massive conversion of rainforests and peatlands to palm oil plantations in Malaysia and Indonesia. RAN’s campaign also highlights labour abuses, declining wildlife populations, and violent clashes between communities and palm oil developers.

RAN says these issues cause major risk to the reputations of